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"One comes back out of such abysses, out of such severe sickness, and out of the sickness of strong suspicion new-born, with the skin cast; more sensitive, more wicked, with a finer taste for joy, with a more delicate tongue for all good things, with a merrier disposition, with a second and more dangerous innocence in joy; more childish at the same time, and a hundred times more refined than ever before."

— Friedrich Nietzsche, The Gay Science (via whyallcaps)

(via criminal-delirium)

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"my heart is black ink my sex is a dead sun [III 87]."

— Georges Bataille. Oeuvres Complètes. via Nick Land in The Thirst for Annihilation. (via criminal-delirium)

(via criminal-delirium)

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Ma femme

Ma femme

Tags: gif femme
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Continuité de nouveau

Continuité de nouveau

Tags: autoportrait
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"Nostalgia for a lost world can be clothed in numerous forms, and generally it is the feat of cowards, who only know how to moan for what they claim to love, who avoid or know how not to find the possibility of FIGHTING. Behind the facade, there is first of all only nervous depression, violent but incoherent noise, aesthetic reverie and chatter. When a man among others, in this world in which a simple representation of the act has become an object of nausea, tries to enter into combat for the “recovery of the lost world,” he creates a void around himself, he meets only the infinite evasion of all those who have taken upon themselves the task of knowledge and of thought…Nietzsche collapsed In humiliating solitude. The destiny of human life, since it is linked to what is most significant for all men, has perhaps never known a moment that justifies a greater uneasiness than the one in which Nietzsche, alone and in a fit of madness, embraced a horse in the streets of Turin."

— Bataille, “Nietzschean Chronicle” in Visions of Excess (via tiredshoes)

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Tags: my work
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"

Tyger! Tyger! Burning brightIn
the forests of the night:What immortal hand or eye
Could frame thy fearful symmetry?

In what distant deeps or skies
Burnt the fire of thine eyes?
On what wings dare he aspire?
What the hand dare seize the fire?

And what shoulder, and what art,
Could twist the sinews of thy heart?
And when thy heart began to beat,
What dread hand? And what dread feet?

What the hammer? What the chain?
In what furnace was thy brain?
What the anvil? What dread grasp
Dare its deadly terrors clasp?

When the stars threw down their spears,
And water’d heaven with their tears:
Did He smile His work to see?
Did He who made the Lamb make thee?

Tyger! Tyger! Burning brightIn the forests of the night:
What immortal hand or eye
Dare frame thy fearful symmetry?

"

— William Blake, “The Tyger”. (via lonelyshadow97)

(Source : sturmunddrangromanticism, via criminal-delirium)

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lost & (pro)found

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"Only great pain, that long, slow pain in which we are burned with green wood, as it were - pain which takes its time - only this forces us philosophers to descend into our ultimate depths and to put away all trust, all good-naturedness, all that would veil, all mildness, all that is medium - things in which formerly we may have found our humanity. I doubt that such a pain makes us “better,” but I know that it makes us more profound."

— Friedrich Nietzsche, Nietzsche Contra Wagner. (via batarde)

Tags: Nietzsche
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heteroglossia:

Foucault’s copy of Anti-Oedipus offered by Deleuze with drawings by his two children. Deleuze points to the drawings and notes in yellow, “Oedipus does not exist.”

heteroglossia:

Foucault’s copy of Anti-Oedipus offered by Deleuze with drawings by his two children. Deleuze points to the drawings and notes in yellow, “Oedipus does not exist.

(Source : universalestate)

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"As a corporeal field of cultural play, gender is a basically innovative affair, although it is quite clear that there are strict punishments for contesting the script by performing out of turn or through unwarranted improvisations."

— Judith Butler, “Performative acts and gender constitution: An essay in phenomenology and feminist theory”

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"The reproduction of the category of gender is enacted on a large political scale, as when women first enter a profession or gain certain rights, or are reconceived in legal or political discourse in significantly new ways. But the more mundane reproduction of gendered identity takes place through the various ways in which bodies are acted in relationship to the deeply entrenched or sedimented expectations of gendered existence. Consider that there is a sedimentation of gender norms that produces the peculiar phenomenon of a natural sex, or a real woman, or any number of prevalent and compelling social fictions, and that this is a sedimentation that over time has produced a set of corporeal styles which, in reified form, appear as the natural configuration of bodies into sexes which exist in a binary relation to one another."

— Judith Butler, “Performative acts and gender constitution: An essay in phenomenology and feminist theory”

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According to what we have said, being-in is not a “property” which Dasein sometimes has and sometimes does not have, without which it could be just as well as it could be with it. It is not the case that human being “is,” and then on top of that has a relation of being to the “world” which it sometimes takes upon itself. Dasein is never “initially” a sort of a being which is free from being-in, but which at times is in the mood to take up a “relation” to the world. This taking up of relations to the world is possible only because, as being-in-the-world, Dasein is as it is.

ibid, 57.

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If the question of being is to achieve clarity regarding its own history, a loosening of the sclerotic tradition and a dissolution of the concealments produced by it is necessary. We understand this task as the destruction of the traditional content of ancient ontology which is to be carried out along the guidelines of the question of being. This destruction is based upon the original experiences in which the first, and subsequently guiding, determinations of being were gained.

-excerpt from “The Task of a Destruction of the History of Ontology" within the introduction of Martin Heidegger’s Being and Time, trans. Joan Stambaugh: pp. 21-22.